Pros & Cons of Silestone​

What is Silestone?

This is a human-engineered stone made of quartz pieces that are bound together by a specially designed resin. Silestone is a very popular choice for both countertops.  It can be customized to provide the look that you want.


  • Because the Silestone will be custom engineered for your kitchen, it is ideal for both large and small countertops.
  • Unlike with granite, you will see a consistent look and pattern to the material.
  • It is available in an extensive and wide range of colors, patterns and textures. Some mimic natural stone, while others offer unique effects.
  • Because the stone is bound by resin, it is an ideal base for a variety of counter edges. For instance, relatively fragile marble might react poorly to a scalloped edge but Silestone would be a good choice for this look.
  • Silestone is non-porous and scratch- and fracture-resistant. That makes it hygienic and easy to care for. You also won’t need to seal it annually.


  • It’s more costly than some options like laminate and lower grades of granite.
  • Silestone doesn’t have the varied and unpredictable patterns of granite or marble.
  • The resins may react to certain chemicals and become cloudy; be careful when deciding which cleaning products to use on the countertop.
  • Unlike with granite or marble, you cannot put hot pans directly on Silestone. You will need to use a protector.
  • Manufacturing defects may occur on rare occasions. These include surface pitting, specks of unwanted colors, or artificial-looking streaks with marbled Silestone. Make sure you inspect the countertop carefully before approving it.

Is Silestone Right For You?

Silestone is a highly durable material under most circumstances. It’s easy to clean and care for, making it ideal for households with active kitchens. This stone also offers homeowners more flexibility for the design and look of their home.

What Cost More Granite Or Quartz Countertops

Installing new countertops are one of the biggest decisions in your home. This investment can increase your home’s value and turn your kitchen into a stylish and functional space. It’s worth taking some time to think about what material, color, and cut of countertop will fit your decorating aesthetic and lifestyle.

Two of the most popular materials for countertops are granite and quartz. Granite has been a classic choice for decades, and now quartz is becoming trendy, too. Which one do you choose? Let’s compare these materials:

Granite vs Quartz: The Basics

Both of these materials are durable and available in a variety of colors and patterns. Granite is a solid sheet of natural stone mined from the earth. Quartz is a manmade blend of stone fragments held together with high-tech resins.

Costs Breakdown

Initial Costs

Both of these materials are investments that tend to have better longevity than than inexpensive materials like laminate. For very large or unusually long countertops, quartz may be more inexpensive. That’s because it’s comparatively rare to find granite in extremely large sheets, and difficult to mine and transport it. Meanwhile, quartz can be created in the factory in a wide range of sizes. For small areas, Granite may be the less expensive choice. This is especially true if you’re looking for tiled patterns instead of a solid sheet. In both cases, installation fees should be similar.

Other Costs

Which is the most cost-effective in the long run? Both of these materials are durable and relatively low-maintenance. Due to how it’s made, quartz doesn’t need to be re-sealed. Granite may or may not; be sure to ask your countertop provider for their recommended care instructions.

Which to Choose?

Which stone is right for you? Ultimately, your preferences, lifestyle, and budget are all factors. There are no wrong choices here; some homeowners love the subtle beauty of natural stone and others enjoy the bold look of quartz.

4 Ways to Stay Within Your Kitchen Remodel Budget

I have clients who continually stay within budget. On the other hand, I have clients ask me the best ways to do so (usually as a reactive means, versus proactive).

I surveyed some of my most cost-conscious clients and asked them what keeps them within budget while still getting what they wanted.

1. Determine What’s Most Important To You

Otherwise known as prioritizing and compromising. If you write down your priorities at the beginning, then you’ll be able to hit your must-haves even when unexpected costs start hitting you.

If you know your must-haves include high-end appliances, perhaps your cabinet budget gets lowered.

You might love marble countertops but might do just as well with a less costly alternative that doesn’t require as much maintenance.  

2. Prepare For The Unexpected

It’s going to happen. No matter how well prepared you are, you’re going to have surprises during your kitchen remodeling.

If you don’t prepare for them, these surprises will destroy your budget.

You may find electrical problems behind walls, or water damage once you’ve ripped out a counter.

It’s recommended you set aside 15-20% of your entire budget just for unexpected problems like these.

3. Get Estimates but… Don’t Always Go With the Lowest Bid

Visit Our Showroom TodayIt may seem counter-intuitive when you want to save money, but the corner-cutting comes out of the quality of your work. Always check licenses, references and review sites. Verify BBB ratings.

If a company’s employee doesn’t hold the proper professional certifications and there is a costly mistake, you will be left to foot the bill.

Another consideration is unskilled laborers generally take longer, not knowing their trade. The cost for additional time will be passed along to you.

4. Say “No” to Extras You Think of After Getting Underway

You must be devoted to your budget. If it wasn’t important or crucial enough to fold into the budget at the beginning, you can live without it now.

No matter how incredible the feature is—you have to say no. If your budget calls for basic door handles, don’t switch it to a higher-end handle when you get to the store.

When the project wraps, you’ll be glad you took these steps. No unpleasant surprises, just the work you were expecting.

Ready to sit down with an expert to get some initial costs nailed down?

Call Today

(901) 509-9669 OR (662) 895-0700


How to Do I Budget For a Kitchen Remodel?

You’d be hard pressed to try to show me a homeowner who doesn’t dream of a kitchen remodel.


First thing’s first: you’ve got to figure out your budget.


It might not be the sexiest part of the remodel. But neither is having to halt your remodeling because you overspent.

Setting your kitchen remodeling budget is both easier and harder than it appears.

On the one hand, you can’t just pull a number out of the air. You have to do some research.

Visit Our Showroom TodayOn the other hand, once you know the “formula,” per se, it can be pretty simple to land in your general area.

The first thing you’ll want to consider when you’re first planning your budget is the “why”? What’s yours?

Do you want to remodel primarily to raise the value of your home to sell it within a few years?

Or are you remodeling to make you happier in a home you plan on living in for a long time?

  • Raise the value – Compare it to homes in your neighborhood. Don’t put upscale renovations in a modest neighborhood.
  • For general happiness – Plan changes that will keep your family comfortable and happy. Keep your wishlist affordable.

Regardless of your motivation, we recommend keeping your kitchen remodeling budget between 5-15% of your home’s value.

For example, if your home is valued at $300,000, the budget should be somewhere between 15k and 45k.

When the project wraps, you’ll be glad you took these steps. No unpleasant surprises, just the work you were expecting.


Call Today

(901) 509-9669 OR (662) 895-0700

Should I Refinish or Replace My Counters and Cabinets?

Beautiful kitchen cabinet with marble top and steel sink

Counters and cabinets can make a big impact on value without spending a fortune. But should you replace the counters and cabinets entirely or go for some less-extensive upgrades?

Minor updates can make a big difference. But sometimes the kitchen or bathroom needs significant changes.

Folks ask me often what is better, refacing or an overhaul. I always answer the same: It all depends on you.

First off, no matter what you decide, consider budget, how much time you will continue to live in the house, and time you can devote to the project.

Naturally budget is key, but I want you to consider how much project management time you can devote.

Not having the attention to focus on a major project will get costly. Without your oversight, projects like these often stall. Make sure you are in a good position to make it happen your way.

Small Changes

Modern sink on black kitchen counter with vase of plantWhen you love the overall design of your cabinets and counters, feel as though you have enough space and aren’t cramped but still would like to freshen your look, small changes will likely work for you.

Of all the ways to give your home an updated look, replacing the countertops is one of the easiest without breaking your budget.

New granite countertops add value instantly, so if you have to choose between new cabinets or new countertops, opt for the countertop and simply reface the cabinets.

Consider the no-seam, integral sink. Talk about slick looking. Gift yourself the sink and you’ll never regret the investment. No seams means no gunk. You’ll never look at a drop in sink the same after checking out one of these. Add a backsplash for not much more and the kitchen feels like a different house.

Time to Replace

If you continually find yourself tripping over others in your kitchen, spending too much time trying to find things in your cabinets or never having enough counter space, it’s time to think bigger. New cabinets, new countertops, perhaps even new layout.

You may have a complete shift in color scheme or overall design strategy. Perhaps you are looking to improve convenience and flow within the kitchen.

Maybe there is no major reason, it is just time. Give me a shout and I’ll help you get the ball rolling.

Take care,

We can turn your residential or commercial vision into an affordable reality.


Pros & Cons of Caesarstone

What is Caesarstone?

Some of my clients are looking for a countertop that will last a lifetime. They need something durable that won’t require a great deal of care. For these folks, I recommend Caesarstone.

Granted you will pay a little more. Caesarstone runs higher in pricing in comparison other stone. In 2017, on average, it cost somewhere between $20-$25 per square foot.

But you won’t ever have to replace it. Considering the cost of purchasing many slabs of stone. It comes to less cost over time.

Here are some other things I like and dislike about Caesarstone. I might be a little biased because the stone is such a dream to work with. But we have some gorgeous, lasting results.

Perhaps with my insight, you can decide if Caesarstone is right for you.

What I like…

Caesarstone is a dense manmade stone. It resists chips, scratches, and stains. It’s superb for a busy family that has little time for care.

Unlike granite countertops, Caesarstone doesn’t need yearly sealing. Most spills and stains wipe right off. Use soap and water or a soft sponge. That’s it!

The versatile stone is outstanding for use in kitchens and bathrooms. Caesarstone is colorful. You can’t imagine a style we won’t find. It comes in a wide variety of shades and patterns. Some counters look like natural stone like marble or granite. Others brighten a kitchen with vivid colors.

A fabricator’s dream! Sturdy, but easy to work with. This material can be cut into different sizes and shapes. Go as custom as your imagination takes you with this resilient stone.

What I’m not into…

Caesarstone is scratch and chip resistant, but it can still be damaged. Dropping a pot can chip hard edges and sharp corners. I recommend rounded edges. These are more resistant to this kind of damage.

Honed finishes are more easily damaged than polished finishes. It may scratch if you scrape food off with a metal knife.

Caesarstone tends to be heavier than granite. Make sure your countertop frame is strong enough to support it.

In rare cases, this stone may have manufacturing defects. These include pitting or strange looking veins of color. Other times, there are colors splashed in that weren’t asked for. Always inspect the countertop before having it installed.

Should You Pick Caesarstone?

Moreland Fog Caesarstone

Image courtesy of

This material is a good investment for homes that need a durable, attractive option. If your kitchen gets a lot of use, consider it.

Have several types of stone you are comparing? I’m happy to help you pick. Talk soon!


Contact us today at 662-895-0700 for more answers.

Or drop by our showroom to see what Caesarstone colors are available.

What is the good and bad of buying marble countertops?

Imagine you have come to the point in your project when you’re ready to pick stone. You’ve seen some impressive pictures of marble in a design magazine or book and are all set to commit.

I won’t lie, I love working with marble, it has the most appealing glimmer in kitchens with natural light. Marble projects are always stunning in a unique way, thanks to the swirling patterns and nuanced changes in shade. Used in the palaces of royalty for centuries, marble is truly an upscale, luxurious option for low-impact interiors.

This material has good and bad things to consider, like anything. Let’s talk through those and get a better idea if this attractive stone is right for you.



This gorgeous stone comes in a variety of colors including white, beige, grey, pink, and green. White marble is famous for brightening up spaces. No two counters will be the same because the veins running through them create unique patterns.


The stone is heat-resistant and has cooling properties. This is ideal if you like to put hot pans directly on top of the counter or knead bread dough against the marble.  This softer stone allows you to have the counter refreshed every few years with minor refinishing.


A countertop will always be an investment, but some varieties of marble are quite affordable.


Because marble is a relatively soft and porous stone, it is more fragile than, for example, granite. Over time, even the best cared-for counter will accumulate some damage. You may see:

  • Chips where something heavy was dropped.
  • Stains from spilled wine or tomato sauce.
  • Etching on the surface from splashed lemon juice.
  • Scratches after chopping vegetables against the bare counter.

You can minimize these problems by:

  • Choosing a matte finish or a distracting pattern.
  • Having the stone sealed.
  • Using a cutting board.
  • Wiping up spills immediately.

Is Marble Right for You?

Like I tell my customers, if you require a completely pristine countertop, you may be better off with a harder, stain-resistant stone like quartzite. Yet, many homeowners and home cooks like to watch the marble change over time, telling the history of the family in the home.

Folks who rarely cook in the kitchen or prioritize keeping stone surfaces clean can also enjoy marble’s incredible beauty without much wear and tear. This stone wouldn’t work well with high-impact traffic and isn’t a good choice for a family with kids or larger pets.

If, after reading through these pros and cons you feel you need a more durable stone, definitely check out my post on granite. You might find what you’re looking for in that versatile stone.

Want to come see some marble slabs in person? Give us a quick call to coordinate a visit to our showroom. 

Infographic: Which Countertop Stone is Right for You?

You decided it’s time to replace your kitchen countertops. You’ve seen plenty of pictures of other gorgeous houses highlighted in Memphis by now that your creative juices are flowing. Sure, you’ve taken color scheme, design, and layout in mind. But have you actually thought about what material is right for you?